Rules & Code of Conduct

All attendees agree to abide by the following rules for the hackathon and Major League Hacking's Code of Conduct which can be found here - http://static.mlh.io/docs/mlh-code-of-conduct.pdf

  1. Treat all attendees with utmost respect. Be kind and helpful to others. Do not insult or put down other attendees for not knowing something. We are all here to learn. Behave professionally. Remember that harassment and racist, sexist, or exclusionary jokes are not appropriate for this event. If at any point you see a fellow participant being harassed, it’s your responsibility to talk to the nearest hackathon organizer. Organizers have the right to disqualify any participant that does not abide by these rules.
    * Harassment includes offensive verbal comments related to gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, religion, sexual images in public spaces, deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of talks or other events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention.
  2. Treat our sponsors, partners, mentors, and volunteers with the utmost respect. Without them nothing would be possible. Take some time out of your work to go meet and speak with them. If they come over to talk to you look up from your work and give them a bit of your time. They're here for you! Show them you appreciate it.
  3. To ensure fairness for all participants, all code, design, art, music, SFX, and assets must be created during the duration of the hackathon. The exception to the above rule is that you are encouraged to use 3rd party services, APIs, open source projects, libraries, and frameworks. This means you can bring plans/blueprints and ideas but you cannot bring something pre-built to the hackathon.
  4. No backseat driving. If you overhear people working through a problem, you shouldn't intermittently lob advice across the room. This can lead to the "too many cooks" problem, but more importantly, it can be rude and disruptive to half-participate in work that isn’t yours.
  5. Be mindful that certain content and actions can make the people around you uncomfortable. If your hack contains material that might cross a boundary, talk to an organizer or team member. They'll review it with the team and notify you if you should go forward or make some appropriate changes. Don't waste time on a hack that won't be allowed to demo.
  6. All members of a team must be physically present during the entirety of the event to be considered for prizes.
  7. There will be no alcohol or drugs allowed at the event.
  8. Have fun. Hackathons are amazing, and so are you. We’re so happy you’re able to hack with us and be a part of our amazing community.
  9. Be the change you want to see in your local community. Your greatness and greatness comes from the very things that make you different. Tap into your experiences, your culture, your background, and the experiences of those in your community and use it to guide you throughout the building process. It doesn't matter where you go to school or where you come from, you can do anything.